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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 218 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the bill to save the economy went down to defeat in the house of representatives. >> the legislation has failed. >> i'm very disappointed in today's vote. >> so to the democrats skprerep who vetoed this bill yesterday, i say step up to the plate. >> this is what brought us to the brink of collapse. >> wow. all because annie went and got a house he couldn't afford? >> i don't know whose fault that was. >> $1.2 trillion in market value wiped out in one day. congress quickly reconvened, and four days later, on october 3rd, it passed the $700 billion troubled asset relief program. >> congress has agreed to a broad deal that authorizes the presidential secretary to free up the criticisms. that may be the last time the president witnessed something that really mattered to washington. four years later, and on the eve of another election, he's being asked, are you better off off than they were. but how much money could you have? if washington had put aside its pride, they could work with some people. >> these two have had your back. sheila baer's job was to deal with banks. neil's job was to be
the economy went down to defeat in the house of representatives. >> the legislation has failed -- >> i'm very disappointed in today's vote. >> to the democrats and republicans who oppose this plan yesterday, i say, step up to the plate. >> investors panicked, the dow dropped 777 points. the biggest single day point loss to date. >> this is what brought us to the brink of collapse. >> wow. all because annie went and got a house that he could not afford? >> $1.2 trillion in market value wiped out in one day. it's really psychological at this point. >> congress quickly reconvened and four days later on october 3rd, it passed the $700 billion troubled asset relief program. >> congress has agreed to a broad deal that authorizes the treasury secretary to start releasing money to free up the credit systems. that may have been the last time persons witnessed bipartisan compromise on something that really mattered in washington. four years later and on the eve of another election, voters are being asked, are you better off than you were then? the answer is yes because it was that bad. but how much bet
on it to ease its mounting losses. the u.s. economy shows more signs of slowing, and slowing down faster than expected. but silver has been red hot. where is the demand coming from and can it last? we talk with phil baker, the c.e.o. of hecla mining. that and more tonight on nbr! we begin with discouraging news about the sluggish economy. by the broadest measurement, economic growth slowed sharply in the second quarter. the gross domestic product was revised considerably lower today. growth was 1.3% in the april through june period. just a month ago, the estimate was 1.7%. add that to a big drop in purchases of big ticket items, like washing machines and furniture. in august, durable goods orders fell 13.2%, and you've got an economy that's just muddling along. but one ray of encouragement-- fewer people filed for unemployment benefits for the first time last week. claims fell by 26,000 to their july lows of 359,000 claims. on wall street, the dow jumped 72 points, the nasdaq added almost 43 points, the s&p up 13. while the u.s. continues working through problems left over by the great recess
are really pretty slack, and for government to withdraw support from the economy as the tories have done since 2010 has really been a recipe for a double dip recession and sure enough we have got one. >> you actually have got an interesting case study, america is a much bigger economy than the uk but our two countries were dealing with the financial crisis more or less in the same way. >> yes. >> a new government came in, not just austerity but masochism that is being -- >> by each other --. there is masochism in the uk with respect to the economic, a collector austerity around europe which is related, a separate point. >> the uk laboratory has been used to test the thesis that by contracting government spending you presto expand private enterprise. it hasn't worked and that way we ended up with a simple national -- >> why is that? >> because the private sector is not spending, sitting on 750 billion pounds of cash and not investing, consumers have their wits frightened out of them, export markets are slack, prto, if all of the indicators are point manager the wrong direction you have n
views on the global economy and perhaps you could start with europe and make your way around the world and perspective on what you see in terms of growth and perhaps more importantly you know, what are the challenges that we are going to have to deal with over the next period of time? >> there's not enough time for all the challenges but let me give you some perspective. let me get to -- let me give away the punchline. the punchline is i think in a world races, the world is not going to come to coming to an end. we are going to muddle through but there are a lot of challenges and a lot of risks that i think the largest outcome come the largest for signage likely outcome by far is that we get through it and a lot of action were to be taken to offer some relief but there are several things that could cause things to derail in which case it would be a lot tougher for a lot longer. but you asked about europe. i think the biggest problem that europe has is growth and the risk problem is the go off the rail, bus stop of the euro. a few months ago we would have said that the two big issues fo
such difficulty, you know, in the economy because of federal reserve policy. likelihood of hearing this, very very slim. and maybe seeing how would you balance a budget? in our campaign we had a precise plan of cutting a trillion dollars and balancing the budget in three years. you know, we're in this horrendous crisis and neither one of them are going to say anything, oh, maybe we ought to cut something. there's no proposal to cut anything. it's also tinkering around with massive automatic increases and the american people are starting to wake up and realize it is all fiction and they are not serious. connell: congressman paul, thanks as always. >> thanks. connell: fox business network, beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern live from denver, neil cavuto will be on the next hour to talk about the debate. neil cavuto. dagen: the economy will be a big focus of tonight's debate. adp the payroll processing firm came out earlier this morning and reported that 162,000 private sector jobs were added last month. more than expected. to weigh in on that, and the debate, the head of u.s. interest rate strategy at u
at the format now, it's all on the economy. if i were jim lerher i'd have more flexibility. it's dominating the headlines finally. if i'm romney, i'd bring it up in an answer. why? the economic security is tied to the national security. he has an opportunity, i think, to slip it in. question is, will he? >> greg: yes. will he slip it in? i'm not sure -- >> andrea: greg, i have to tell you something, greg. you know, i have been away from you guys for less than 24 hours but i had a dream about you guys last night. >> greg: really? i need to know now. >> andrea: yes. eric bolling was giving danad nutritional advice and you and i went furniture shopping. weird. google fresh i can. i don't know how to hand -- >> greg: freaky. i don't know how to handal that. >> dana: it could be the rarefied air. i'm curious if you walked down the hall to gymnasium, when i was on the university of denver gymnastic team. i think they showcased themselves well so far. >> greg: way to drop in your background as a gymnast. stop it! >> dana: anything. >> andrea: i haven't seen your shots yet. it haven't seen the pict
oversight council headed by the us treasury said it is preparing to act to protect the economy. >> if investors get any sense that there might be a failure, they'll all race for the exit. and that's the equivalent of a run on the bank and there is no one there-- no one like a parent with capital or the fdic to supply capital if there's that kind of race for the et. >> reporter: three options are on the table. instead of a fixed value of $1, money market funds could be required to use a floating value. regulators are also considering whether money market fund companies should hold some of their assets as a buffer against a surge in withdrawals or whether to require investors to wait before they can get back a portion of their money. the s.e.c. could try again to pass new rules, but if it doesn't, the stability council could decide some big money market funds need closer regulation. that idea worries fund companies. >> it would result in significantly more costs and regulation and who would want to invest in a fund that the federal government has designated as systemically import
output at a plant as the economy slows and demand weakens. meantime 40% of china's iron ore mines are standing idle as steel prices have crumbled. and loans to firms and households fell more than expected. ecb staying loans to the private sector fell 0.6% from the same month a year ago. italy's borrowing costs falling at a bond auction today. analysts say the auction shows nand for italian government paper remains healthy. and eu regulators are prepare to go charge microsoft for failing to comply with a 2009 ruling. that ruling had on ordered the company to offer user as choice of web browsers. apparently they may not have done that. if guilty, microsoft could face fines of up to 10% of its global revenues. and that would be a lot of money. >> iran still, we're this close to nuclear -- think our unfunded labels are like 60 trillion or something. europe back in the crapper, but the refs. huh? >> i told you, i don't always like unions. i'm actually happy that the refs union won. >> it does provide a release from some of the travails and the worries of every day life. spoorts is spor
of the economy, and if that stops jobs are going to stop, too and so is everything else. >> larry, i think those are very good points. i would argue most of the weakness we are seeing in the manufacturing side is a function of much weaker export s because of weakness in europe and asia. i think what we are seeing in the latest chicago data is a catchup with all the other weakness we had seen in earlier surveys. i think the economy is weak. it's not strong by any means but the labor market looks like it is growing. i don't think it will rollover from modest job growth. claims are ploe low and tax receipts are improving. >> 1 30i7b 3% depend we got earlier this weak. a lot of people would call ate growth recession. i want to ask is this stall-speed or an actual recession? >> i think we have slowed since the 1.3% second quarter number larry. we are seeing durable goods orders down in july and august. we are seeing the pmi is down. importantly, europe is moving in to a recession. germany is now in recession and china is not doing its stimulus. you have a coordinated global slow down starts now and i
economy that fosters opportunity or do we want a stagnant economy that fosters dependency? that is not who we are. we want to live free and prosper. we want to believe. [applause] when president obama came into office, he inherited a tough situation. the problem is the obama economic agenda failed, not because it was stopped. it failed because it was passed. do not forget this. he came into office with the ability to pass anything of his choosing. he did that. remember the stimulus? remember the idea that if we borrow $831 billion and spend it on pet projects and interest groups, they said unemployment would never reach 8%. we would be growing at 4% a year right now. unemployment has been above 8% for 43 months. our economy last quarter stalled at 1.3%. what is worse for all of these promises about cutting the deficit, growing the economy, bringing people together in a bipartisan fashion -- i will not even get into the oceans and tides. [laughter] i have heard that one. all of these promises were made. the idea of how been changed. it sounded good. -- the idea of hope and change. it sounde
, caterpillar, bellweathers for the economy, it sends a weak signal about the economy. sooner or later, gravity will overwhelm the central bank easing. the question is, does it happen before or after the election? >>neil: we live in the moment and i do not dispute what you are saying. but i do say the barometer has been right 90 percent of the time. as the quarter goes before the election, so go the election for or against the incumbent. this are many other barometers that point in a variety different ways so this is one of them. it doesn't necessarily mean anything. i am wondering if what this is saying for president obama is that people are going to look at their financial statements, if they are lucky enough to have accounts and they are up, or they will look at their home values if they are lucky enough to have a home going up in value and they feel, on paper, some of this wealth affect we hear about. you dismiss that? >>guest: well, it is a good point that perhaps what this is telling us is that bernanke at the federal reserve is throwing the kitchen sink at this to stimulate it through th
the economy likely added 155,000 private payroll jobs this month. we'll bring you the number and get you instant reaction from joel prakken. in corporate news, richard schultz is pressing forward with a possible $11 billion buyout of the retailer. schultz and at least four private equity firms have reportedly started examining the books of the economy. at the same time, he is said to be negotiating individually with the pe firms on the details of how his roughly 20% stake in the company would contribute and what role he might be playing after a buyout. and oracle ceo larry ellison says the company won't be making any major acquisitions during the next couple years. in an interview on "closing bell" yesterday, ellison said he is instead focused on growing organically. he also discussed the dividend. >> that's the decision of the oracle board of directors. i believe we'll gradually increase the dividend as opposed to dublg it or tripling it all at once. nothing dramatic. >> shares of oracle during the last year, take a look at it. 31.65. he's gotten close to the top there, joe. >> all righ
at the dynamics economically at play in ohio. governor cakasic's great job of sheparding the ohio economy to account for state unemployment 7.2%, lower than the national average, it also undercuts mitt romney's message this economy isn't in turn around and time to get someone else. >> makes john kasic a hobbled sur row gate for mitt romney, you can't say the economy is great when you're trying to prove the economy is bad. thing about ohio it's an important state, and remember when 2004 the whole election came down to john kerry losing narrowly to george w. bush in that state, the president has a couple huge advantages we're seeing in the ten-point game, one is the auto bailout. there is no state besides michigan be impacted more positively by the auto bailout than ohio. 82 out of 88 counties have an auto parts supplier in them that's felt a direct effect of the bailout. part of why the economy is doing better there. it's enough to move the needle. also the case that anti-union backlash in the industrial midwest and wisconsin has motivated organized labor in ohio in a way, the case always
. the economy is obviously a big part of this story. the qe announcement providing a shock to stock. we'll talk to charlie evans at 8:30 eastern time. and then it is your money, your vote. we'll start the countdown to the first presidential tee batd, that is on wednesday night. we'll be turning to a pair of political strategists in the next half hour for a preview. plus a cnbc exclusive, julia boars sten catching up with sheryl sandberg. including just how many people put everything about themselves online. >> does it scare that you you've helped create a generation of oversharers? >> i think what we give is people the ability to share what they want. what is one person's ridiculous oversharing is another person's regular day and we build technology that lets users share what they want to share and that's tremendously exciting. >> julia will join us with more of that conversation coming up at 7:30. and we'll find out why craig barrett is not a facebook fan. and in sports news, yes, europe has retained the ryder cup. staging a comeback after the u.s. began sunday with a big lead. europe has won
to find work in today's economy. too many of those whore payc.ng are liaycheck to acare ling in poverty than when president obama took office. and 15 million more are on food stamps. my plan will create 12 million new jobs over the next four years. we shoul'teasure compassion by how many pele are on wee. hosuomio by how many people are able to get off welfare and get a good paying job. i'm mitt romney, and i approved this message. >> i think that ad just makes my odorning, it's thursday, september 27th, as you take a look at a wet times square in new york city. i'm in chicago this morning, but with us in new york city wh willie geist, our national affairs editor for "new york" magazine andnbit analyst, john heilemann. also former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst steve ratner and nbc news chief affairs correspondent and ht of "andrea mitchell reports." >> we have affairs. >> andrea mitchell. aninasto f "the politico playbook," executive executor jim vandehei. of course, willie, we've got a lot to talk about. let's start really quickly with the refs! >> they're back. >
while consumer prices slipped further in august raising fears the world's third biggest economy could yet fall into recession by year end. >>> what a big day. >> super friday. >> we have the french budget proposal, the results of the spain audit/stress test, we've got, what else -- it's the end of the quarter. britain is announcing it libor reforms. >> that's not what i was talking about. it's the ryder cup, folks. forget all that stuff. >> by the way, i had to google the ryder cup. >> far more important event. >> we'll talk about that later in the program. >> i don't know who insisted on that, but apparently we are going to cover it. >> before we get to that, the government of hollande is about to present it first budget. its expected to whicheverdelives of tax hikes. meantime european policymakers are appraising spain's reform plan. but today the government must brace for the results of the banking stress tests that will determine the recapitalization needs of the country's most troubled lenders. we have steve sedgwick following the story in thmadrid, but firs out to stefane i
a lot more on this at 8:00 a.m. today. make sure you tune into that. >>> moving on to the economy a key issue in this presidential election as you know. that's what sean hannity is talking about with the dnc vice-chairman. he is pressing him on whether or not he thinks the president has been successful turning the economy around. >> how would you grade him on the economy? >> i would say this president must have a strong job of walking into a crisis. >> give me a grade. what's the grade? >> i would give if an a. i would say the it's incomplete we want to finish the job. you and i know this the president walked into a mess, right? let's stop and think about it. >> so did ronald reagan. reagan 8 percent growth in his presidency. >> we are not debating ronald reagan. >> he had a worse economy than oba obama. he said he was inheriting it but he hasn't fixed it. we are seeing economic growth we are heading toward a recession and it's getting worse. >> we told you this yesterday stay stuned for that. right now it is time for your first degree weather update with janice dean who has more on the
for lou dobbs. an election that was supposed to be all about the struggling economy, right? now leading to questions over the president's handling of foreign policy and the administrations truthfulness to the american people. to reporreport the united states diplomats in libya asked the obama administration repeatedly for additional security right up until the september 11, 2012 attacks. house oversight committee chairman darrell ice looking to secretary of state hillary clinton for answers. telling congressmen issa the extra resources are being denied despite firebombings and online death threats. vice presidential nominee paul ryan seizing onnthe commission to launch attacks at the democratic ticket. >> feature if you turn on the ty you can see that the obama foreign-policy is unraveling before our eyes. it's not just an isolated incident where we lost four americans in libya. that's tragic. but it is part of a bigger story of the unraveling of this agenda all over the world. we have distanced our ally, israel, we are not advancing our interests in the middle east, and the president i
's economy is dead flat, teetering on recession. 10-year high for unemployment and france puts in place huge tax increases. bill: i'm reading the two measures bringing around half a billion euros. >> that's it. >> what will that do for them? >> not much. there are other taxes as well which will bring in a total they think of 20 billion euros. bill: higher tax rates on dividends? >> dividends, capital gains, dividends, profits, reinvestment of capital, interest you name it. bill: here is a query for you. are they cutting spending at all? >> by about $10 billion euros. $20 billion worth of tax increases. $10 billion worth of spending cuts gives you a 30 billion euro reduction they think in the budget deficit. bill: well on the spending cuts, how much resistance was there? >> there is going to be a lot of resistance. in france there is really a cradle to grave security system and the state is at the very center of the economy. when the state starts cutting into to spending, cutting down on spending, there will be some resistance and it will be seen on the streets. bill: do you expect the wealth
us about global economies. paul eggers reports next. we are this close... ...to making history. we are this close... this close... we are this close to ending polio. all we need is you. this close... be a part of history at rotary.org the paris auto show comes at a tough time for european automakers. car companies in europe are bracing for a drop in sales. but that didn't stop the spotlight from shining on the city of lights for one of the nation's largest car shows. high-end auto mobiles from bentley, lamborghini and jaguar were rolled out this week, as auto makers target drivers of luxury automobiles. the show comes at a time when new car registrations in the region have slowed 7%. teams from europe and the u.s. are teeing off for the ryder cup this week. this year's match is happening just outside of chicago. paul eggers reports on how the economy is coming into play on the golf course. a gallery of more than 40,000 golf fanatics from across the u.s. and europe will visit medinah country club each of the next three days for golf's premier team event. and they'll pay big bucks fo
. think back to when barack first took off. -- office. right after he was inaugurated. our economy was on the brink of clams. newspapers were using words like meltdown, calamity. create implodes, economy in crisis. for years folks had been lured into buying homes they couldn't afford so their mortgages were under water, banks weren't lending, companies weren't hiring, the auto industry was in crisis. this economy was losing 800,000 jobs every month. 800,000 jobs every month. and a lot of folks whether we were headed for a great depression. see, now that's what barack faced on day one as president of the quiet. but instead of pointing fingers and placing blame, your president got to work. [applause] he was thinking about us. about folks like my dad and like his grandmother and that's why he cracked down on lending adduce -- abuses so today when folks apply for a mortgage or credit card you know exactly what you're getting in to. that's why he cut taxing for families and small businesses. balls we believe that teachers and firefighters should not be paying higher tax rates than milli
18,000 jobs in the sector. that is where the economy is being structured these days. 10,000 jobs in construction. manufacturing, 4000 jobs. melissa: we were looking at 113, does that make that same life? i just want to remind everyone that is not a good number. >> finding the list that the government number includes state and local layoffs. i don't think that adp number includes that. when you look at those two numbers since january, you will see a defeat for 172,000 jobs a month where it is about 150,000. it has to be above 200,000 to keep up with population growth. again, 8.2% we are looking at coming in for friday. lori: full employment around 4%? nobody talks about that anymore. >> we just talk about the jobless rate. lori: the temperature is going down, find your heating costs going way up? the impact the winter will have on the economy. melissa: take a look at metals had with those who break. gold trading up. copper, basically what. we will be right back. ♪ you see us, at the start of the day. on the company phone list that's a few names longer. you see us bank on busier
happening in the economy, disease -- does it not? >> i agree. look, there are major headwinds out there. it's hard to be positive about anything. europe's slowing down can, we're printing money like crazy, and when you're dealing with a world where the growth is coming from reducing friction as opposed to sort of increasing thrust, there's just not a lot of foundation there. there's nothing solid that investors or anyone can really stand on to be positive, in my opinion. david: and, stephen, i didn't like what ben bernanke and his buddies at the fed did, but the fact that they did that indicates that what they were seeing -- they have access to all kinds of data we don't have access to -- what they saw was something bordering on recession, otherwise they would not have gone all in as they did with qe3. >> yeah. you know, make no mistake, from the longer-term perspective, i agree. the negative impact of this easy money, you know, will catch up with us, but i think it's still several years down the road and probably comes most likely in the form of inflation. but right now particularly the eq
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 218 (some duplicates have been removed)

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